LA Porsche and BMW Repair

Mon - Fri: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Articles:

Porsche Engine Oil / Air Separators 101

Porsche Engine Oil / Air Separators 101

The Engine oil air separator directly affects the engine crankcase atmosphere because basically, all Porsche’s from 1980 on, including the current 986, 987, 996, 997, Cayman & Cayenne engines, all are positive crankcase type systems. This means that the engine crankcase has vacuum supplied from the intake manifold to collect and burn the residual combustion by-products or blow-by in the crankcase by running it through the engine again, all in an effort to lower the vehicle emissions. On most occasions when the oil separator fails, the low pressure (vacuum) in the engine crankcase rises to an unusually or abnormally high figure and, more likely than not, it ends up drawing engine oil into the intake system. This usually fouls spark plugs and, in rare cases, causes damage to the oxygen (O2) sensors, catalytic converters and possibly various other sensitive fuel injection components. In extreme cases an oil separator failure with excessively high vacuu ... read more

Categories:

Featured

Porsche Interior Pollen Microfilters

During my commute to work the other day I saw a person wearing a surgical style mask driving a newer Porsche. I assumed the mask was worn to prevent the spread of germs. My first thought was if the driver had any knowledge about the interior micro-filter or air recirculation system in their vehicle. The recirculation system and microfilter work as an integral part of the automobiles ventilation system which allows the operator to choose whether they want interior or exterior air supplied to the passenger compartment of their automobile. If the recirculation feature is chosen, this literally re-circulates the interior air back through the ventilation system and again into the passenger compartment, this also impedes the entry of particulate matter from the exterior of the car. If the recirculation feature is not chosen then exterior air will be supplied through the ventilation system and into the passenger compartment. The 1992 928 was the first P ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

The Do It Yourself Oil Change (DIY)

Working on your own car can be an interesting and rewarding experience. Some people have a higher mechanical aptitude than others, but performing various basic repairs on your automobile can be mastered by anyone with an interest in doing so. We recommend that owners get more familiar with their car, even if it means changing a flat tire or just checking and setting the tire pressures — as long as the proper tools are utilized and correct procedures followed. For those who would like something more challenging, try performing your own engine oil and filter change. If you have never done this, ask your shop if you can observe their technician during an oil change and if they will explain why and what they are doing during every step of the process. The time and effort you pay to learn the proper procedure could pay big dividends towards your first oil and filter change experience. We recommend utilizing a factory or genuine engin ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance

Porsche Check Engine Light (MIL)

Check Engine Light Starting in 1996, all automobiles sold in the United States were mandated by the government to be equipped with On Board Diagnostics II (OBD-II). OBD-II is the protocol of the emissions system; however, it should be considered part of the operating parameters for the engine because it is part of the Digital Motor Electronics (DME) control unit. Much like a scan tool, OBD-II constantly oversees and interrogates the engine, watch­ing for any irregularity or change in operation that is impacting the engine’s emissions. Engine cylinder miss-fires, rich or lean running conditions, cold start opera­tion and fuel tank pressure are just a few of OBD-II over­sight responsibilities. Just about any sensor failure or engine operating system is monitored by OBD-II. The Check Engine Light (CEL) is also known as the Mal­function Indicator Light (MIL) or Service Engine Soon Light. When illuminated, it provides a means of notif ... read more

Automotive Lubricants

Since the introduction of synthetic lubricants, automo­tive maintenance has changed drastically. Some automotive manufactures’ recommen­dations have reached oil change intervals in the 15k and even 20k mile realm, but this does not mean that it is the best recommendation for your engine’s health and extended life. The modern Porsche’s (e.g. the 986-987s and 996-997s) require a more vigorous engine oil change schedule. We suggest that you change your engine oil and filter every 3-5k miles or 6 months (whichever comes first) based on how your car is driven to insure clean internal engine component operation. For cars driven primarily shorter distances (under 10 miles) and/or stop and go traffic a few times (or less) per week, a shorter oil change interval is needed. Cars driven longer distances regularly will do fine with a slightly longer oil change interval. While these service intervals may seem conservative, it is important to recognize that m ... read more

Categories:

Maintenance